Catch-up

Oct. 24th, 2010 11:47 pm
bobquasit: (Sebastian Riding)
So much to catch up on, but I'm too tired - I'll probably miss some of it.

  • Sebastian and I finished the seventh book in the Great Brain series. There's one more, but it wasn't written by John D. Fitzgerald; I suspect it will be a letdown. But the seventh book was a perfect bittersweet ending to the series. Sebastian found it a bit embarrassing, but all in all he loved it and the whole series. I hope the library has the eighth book in stock somewhere!

  • Teri and I were doing some shopping today. One of the places we stopped at was the Wal-Mart in Attleboro. It's a "Super" Wal-Mart, with a complete grocery section. We weren't buying groceries, but I was curious so I looked through it a bit - and was stunned. I've been looking for Underwood Deviled Roast Beef spread in supermarkets for over twenty years now. I haven't seen it in New England for decades. I'd resorted to the internet, buying a case of the stuff (two dozen cans) once a year for about $60. But Wal-Mart had them for $1.72 each! I bought ten. Guess what I had for dinner?

  • We went to a "Books are Wings" party at the Library on Friday or Saturday. The audience seemed a bit young. But when we were looking through the books (each child gets a free one) I let out a gasp of amazement. They had a copy of Mr. Penny! But we'd already picked out another rare book, and weren't allowed to make a second pick. Still, it's amazing that they'd have such a wonderful book.

Catch-up

Oct. 24th, 2010 11:47 pm
bobquasit: (Sebastian Riding)
So much to catch up on, but I'm too tired - I'll probably miss some of it.

  • Sebastian and I finished the seventh book in the Great Brain series. There's one more, but it wasn't written by John D. Fitzgerald; I suspect it will be a letdown. But the seventh book was a perfect bittersweet ending to the series. Sebastian found it a bit embarrassing, but all in all he loved it and the whole series. I hope the library has the eighth book in stock somewhere!

  • Teri and I were doing some shopping today. One of the places we stopped at was the Wal-Mart in Attleboro. It's a "Super" Wal-Mart, with a complete grocery section. We weren't buying groceries, but I was curious so I looked through it a bit - and was stunned. I've been looking for Underwood Deviled Roast Beef spread in supermarkets for over twenty years now. I haven't seen it in New England for decades. I'd resorted to the internet, buying a case of the stuff (two dozen cans) once a year for about $60. But Wal-Mart had them for $1.72 each! I bought ten. Guess what I had for dinner?

  • We went to a "Books are Wings" party at the Library on Friday or Saturday. The audience seemed a bit young. But when we were looking through the books (each child gets a free one) I let out a gasp of amazement. They had a copy of Mr. Penny! But we'd already picked out another rare book, and weren't allowed to make a second pick. Still, it's amazing that they'd have such a wonderful book.

bobquasit: (Default)
I've been looking for this online for a long time. It's from Critters #50. I have the original in a box in the basement somewhere, but I never got around to digging it out.

Warning, it's not for the faint of heart! It's really funny, but doesn't hold back at all. It will try to turn you into a life-long vegetarian.

Without further ado, here's The Story of Beef!
bobquasit: (Default)
I've been looking for this online for a long time. It's from Critters #50. I have the original in a box in the basement somewhere, but I never got around to digging it out.

Warning, it's not for the faint of heart! It's really funny, but doesn't hold back at all. It will try to turn you into a life-long vegetarian.

Without further ado, here's The Story of Beef!

The Y

Jul. 13th, 2010 11:44 pm
bobquasit: (Default)
I heard that the YMCA is dropping the "MCA" from its name. Interesting.

It was another good day. Sebastian had his first day at summer camp; it's the day care/kindergarten that he went to for several years after he turned two. He'd begged to go again for summer camp this year (they take kids older than him, too).

I couldn't go along to drop him off, since I was working. But Teri said that when they got there, a lot of kids recognized him and shouted "Sebastian!" and the look on his face was priceless; he didn't know what to do! Of course he had a great time and was trying to arrange a play date with one of his friends when we came to pick him up.

Teri had suggested that we work out at the Y tonight, and had me call them to reserve a place for Sebastian in the 5:30 kid's exercise class. They told me that the 4:30 class was nearly full, but that no one else had called for the 5:30 class; unless they had at least two kids, there wouldn't BE a class tonight. They said they'd call me at 5 and let me know.

But they didn't. So I called back. It turned out that we'd screwed up; there were NO classes on Tuesday night, as I should have remembered! But there was a new program for kids aged 6-12; an hour of supervised activity in the gym, and then an hour of supervised swimming. Sebastian begged to go. Teri initially said no, but eventually we got her to change her mind.

We dropped him off, and then went over to Chelo's for dinner. It was delicious; I've really come to enjoy their light grilled chicken dinner! I wish I knew how they made the chicken taste so good.

After dinner we headed back to the gym, worked out for a while (I put in 37 good hard minutes on the elliptical machine), and then took Sebastian home. He'd had a lot of fun, although he'd fallen and hit his shin rather badly while he was there. There's a large red bump on his leg, but it doesn't hurt him much and doesn't seem to be restricting his movement at all. We'll take a look at it tomorrow, and if we're at all unsure we'll call his doctor.

The Y

Jul. 13th, 2010 11:44 pm
bobquasit: (Default)
I heard that the YMCA is dropping the "MCA" from its name. Interesting.

It was another good day. Sebastian had his first day at summer camp; it's the day care/kindergarten that he went to for several years after he turned two. He'd begged to go again for summer camp this year (they take kids older than him, too).

I couldn't go along to drop him off, since I was working. But Teri said that when they got there, a lot of kids recognized him and shouted "Sebastian!" and the look on his face was priceless; he didn't know what to do! Of course he had a great time and was trying to arrange a play date with one of his friends when we came to pick him up.

Teri had suggested that we work out at the Y tonight, and had me call them to reserve a place for Sebastian in the 5:30 kid's exercise class. They told me that the 4:30 class was nearly full, but that no one else had called for the 5:30 class; unless they had at least two kids, there wouldn't BE a class tonight. They said they'd call me at 5 and let me know.

But they didn't. So I called back. It turned out that we'd screwed up; there were NO classes on Tuesday night, as I should have remembered! But there was a new program for kids aged 6-12; an hour of supervised activity in the gym, and then an hour of supervised swimming. Sebastian begged to go. Teri initially said no, but eventually we got her to change her mind.

We dropped him off, and then went over to Chelo's for dinner. It was delicious; I've really come to enjoy their light grilled chicken dinner! I wish I knew how they made the chicken taste so good.

After dinner we headed back to the gym, worked out for a while (I put in 37 good hard minutes on the elliptical machine), and then took Sebastian home. He'd had a lot of fun, although he'd fallen and hit his shin rather badly while he was there. There's a large red bump on his leg, but it doesn't hurt him much and doesn't seem to be restricting his movement at all. We'll take a look at it tomorrow, and if we're at all unsure we'll call his doctor.
bobquasit: (Default)
To my surprise, Sebastian took another walk with me today. It was shorter than I wanted, only about 25 minutes, but we had a nice stroll.

Earlier tonight, I did an experiment of sorts. I mixed equal amounts of ground turkey and ground beef together, made it into hamburgers, and barbecued them.

I didn't like the way the meats mixed together; they weren't homogenous, but seemed like very moist clay. The texture seemed wrong. I mixed in a small amount of my soy sauce & Worcestershire marinade, but was very dubious about the whole thing - so much so that I grabbed some hot dogs and threw them on the grill too.

The burgers had the color of chicken breasts, and didn't smell quite right. I was psyching myself into nausea. But when I finally tried one, I have to admit: it was virtually indistinguishable from a regular beef burger. And I think it was probably a good bit healthier, since it had half the red meat of my usual burgers!
bobquasit: (Default)
To my surprise, Sebastian took another walk with me today. It was shorter than I wanted, only about 25 minutes, but we had a nice stroll.

Earlier tonight, I did an experiment of sorts. I mixed equal amounts of ground turkey and ground beef together, made it into hamburgers, and barbecued them.

I didn't like the way the meats mixed together; they weren't homogenous, but seemed like very moist clay. The texture seemed wrong. I mixed in a small amount of my soy sauce & Worcestershire marinade, but was very dubious about the whole thing - so much so that I grabbed some hot dogs and threw them on the grill too.

The burgers had the color of chicken breasts, and didn't smell quite right. I was psyching myself into nausea. But when I finally tried one, I have to admit: it was virtually indistinguishable from a regular beef burger. And I think it was probably a good bit healthier, since it had half the red meat of my usual burgers!

Restaurant

Apr. 30th, 2010 11:17 pm
bobquasit: (Default)
We went to a new restaurant tonight.

There had been another restaurant there for years, but a month or two ago I noticed that it was gone; the new restaurant was an ice-cream stand plus (apparently) a restaurant. We ate there tonight, and I was so pleased at the experience that I went over to Yelp. They didn't have a listing for the new restaurant, so I marked that the old one was closed, and added the details for the new one. I also wrote an extensive review of the new place.

And when I clicked on "Submit", goddamn Yelp told me that the restaurant had already been added - and showed me the listing for the OLD restaurant! Maybe the problem was that they had the same address. But what really pissed me off was that they apparently deleted the review, too.

But this isn't my first time around the block. I saved it before submitting.
Read more... )
I wrote to Yelp support. We'll see what happens.

Restaurant

Apr. 30th, 2010 11:17 pm
bobquasit: (Default)
We went to a new restaurant tonight.

There had been another restaurant there for years, but a month or two ago I noticed that it was gone; the new restaurant was an ice-cream stand plus (apparently) a restaurant. We ate there tonight, and I was so pleased at the experience that I went over to Yelp. They didn't have a listing for the new restaurant, so I marked that the old one was closed, and added the details for the new one. I also wrote an extensive review of the new place.

And when I clicked on "Submit", goddamn Yelp told me that the restaurant had already been added - and showed me the listing for the OLD restaurant! Maybe the problem was that they had the same address. But what really pissed me off was that they apparently deleted the review, too.

But this isn't my first time around the block. I saved it before submitting.
Read more... )
I wrote to Yelp support. We'll see what happens.
bobquasit: (Default)
Stayed up late last night. On Sunday I made a pan of chocolate-chip cookie bars for Sebastian's Cub Scout open house on Tuesday (tonight), but on reflection it seemed likely that it wouldn't be enough. So I made another pan tonight. He asked me to make them chocolate with white chocolate chips.

The white chocolate chips were pretty old, though, and to tell you the truth they're not very good-tasting. So I used the new bag of chocolate chips instead. It wasn't hard to make the cookie dough chocolate; I just added 2/3 of a cup of powdered baking cocoa. They smell delicious. It should be a pretty intense chocolate experience!

Too damned tired.
bobquasit: (Default)
Stayed up late last night. On Sunday I made a pan of chocolate-chip cookie bars for Sebastian's Cub Scout open house on Tuesday (tonight), but on reflection it seemed likely that it wouldn't be enough. So I made another pan tonight. He asked me to make them chocolate with white chocolate chips.

The white chocolate chips were pretty old, though, and to tell you the truth they're not very good-tasting. So I used the new bag of chocolate chips instead. It wasn't hard to make the cookie dough chocolate; I just added 2/3 of a cup of powdered baking cocoa. They smell delicious. It should be a pretty intense chocolate experience!

Too damned tired.

Food!

Sep. 21st, 2009 02:37 pm
bobquasit: (Default)
Today seems to be food day over on Askville. From a discussion about hamburgers, we ended up talking about Friendly's and how they used to serve their hamburgers on toasted white bread:


They changed their Fribbles, too. I remember when I was a kid, my mother would take me there. I'd order a chocolate Fribble, and a long spoon. There'd usually be a few lumps of vanilla ice cream in the bottom of the glass, and I'd fish them out and eat them. Yum!

That's because the Fribbles were made with hard vanilla ice cream and chocolate syrup, of course. Now, unfortunately, they're just made with some soft-serve-like stuff. It's nowhere near as good, and it's boringly consistent all the way through.

I like Friendly's hot dogs, too. But I loved Brigham's ice cream and food even more. Their burgers, fries, and hot dogs were outstanding, and they had a delicious pea soup sometimes; I could literally stick a fork in it and it would stay standing up! As for their hot fudge sundaes, well, they were perfect. And I used to buy their hand-packed ice cream as a special treat; it cost twice what it did in the supermarkets, but it was three times as good.

The chain went bankrupt a few years ago. Hood makes the Brigham's ice cream that you see in supermarkets now. I don't know if any of the stores are still open; if they are, there aren't many of them.

Lots of wonderful old things are gone, or have been replaced with ersatz and homogenized out of existence.

autumn00™:0), did you ever try Newport Creamery? They're another New England ice cream/food chain, much like Friendly's and Brighams. They're based out of Newport, Rhode Island. For a while they were expanding into Massachusetts and possibly elsewhere in New England, but they almost went out of business a few years ago. They managed to hang on, fortunately.

They make excellent burgers/fries/hot dogs/etc., but what they're best known for is Awful Awfuls. Those are big, thick ice cream shakes which are a lot like the classic old Fribbles. They were almost made the state drink of Rhode Island, but lost out to coffee milk.

Newport Creamery's chocolate chip ice cream sandwiches are really memorable too. It's $10 for a pack of four, but they're totally worth it - particularly when filled with chocolate chip cookie dough ice cream.

God, I'm so hungry!!!

Food!

Sep. 21st, 2009 02:37 pm
bobquasit: (Default)
Today seems to be food day over on Askville. From a discussion about hamburgers, we ended up talking about Friendly's and how they used to serve their hamburgers on toasted white bread:


They changed their Fribbles, too. I remember when I was a kid, my mother would take me there. I'd order a chocolate Fribble, and a long spoon. There'd usually be a few lumps of vanilla ice cream in the bottom of the glass, and I'd fish them out and eat them. Yum!

That's because the Fribbles were made with hard vanilla ice cream and chocolate syrup, of course. Now, unfortunately, they're just made with some soft-serve-like stuff. It's nowhere near as good, and it's boringly consistent all the way through.

I like Friendly's hot dogs, too. But I loved Brigham's ice cream and food even more. Their burgers, fries, and hot dogs were outstanding, and they had a delicious pea soup sometimes; I could literally stick a fork in it and it would stay standing up! As for their hot fudge sundaes, well, they were perfect. And I used to buy their hand-packed ice cream as a special treat; it cost twice what it did in the supermarkets, but it was three times as good.

The chain went bankrupt a few years ago. Hood makes the Brigham's ice cream that you see in supermarkets now. I don't know if any of the stores are still open; if they are, there aren't many of them.

Lots of wonderful old things are gone, or have been replaced with ersatz and homogenized out of existence.

autumn00™:0), did you ever try Newport Creamery? They're another New England ice cream/food chain, much like Friendly's and Brighams. They're based out of Newport, Rhode Island. For a while they were expanding into Massachusetts and possibly elsewhere in New England, but they almost went out of business a few years ago. They managed to hang on, fortunately.

They make excellent burgers/fries/hot dogs/etc., but what they're best known for is Awful Awfuls. Those are big, thick ice cream shakes which are a lot like the classic old Fribbles. They were almost made the state drink of Rhode Island, but lost out to coffee milk.

Newport Creamery's chocolate chip ice cream sandwiches are really memorable too. It's $10 for a pack of four, but they're totally worth it - particularly when filled with chocolate chip cookie dough ice cream.

God, I'm so hungry!!!
bobquasit: (Default)
I don't often answer questions on Askville any more, but this was one I absolutely couldn't resist.

"what is your favorite way to grill hamburgers?"

What do you use in your ground beef to make your hamburgers the best? I like to use a little Worcestershire sauce and salt & pepper. But I am always looking for that perfect hamburger. Please let me know your favorites.
 

I’ve been questing for the perfect hamburger for more than thirty years now. I have a remarkably narrow palate - I don't eat fish, or any sort of birds if I can help it, and I'm not comfortable with the texture of steak - so I’ve probably eaten more hamburgers than almost anyone else in the world. Here’s how I cook mine.
 

Read more... )

P.S. - Leftover burgers can be refrigerated for a few days or frozen for much longer. They re-heat best either on the grill (be careful not to overcook!) or by being wrapped in aluminum foil with bit of marinade and put in the oven at around 450 degrees for ten to fifteen minutes (this is handy to do if you're making french fries in the oven as well). They'll be on the well-done side, but still very flavorful! I've also had excellent results using leftover hamburgers to make dirty rice. The smokiness of the burgers adds a nice extra kick.


bobquasit: (Default)
I don't often answer questions on Askville any more, but this was one I absolutely couldn't resist.

"what is your favorite way to grill hamburgers?"

What do you use in your ground beef to make your hamburgers the best? I like to use a little Worcestershire sauce and salt & pepper. But I am always looking for that perfect hamburger. Please let me know your favorites.
 

I’ve been questing for the perfect hamburger for more than thirty years now. I have a remarkably narrow palate - I don't eat fish, or any sort of birds if I can help it, and I'm not comfortable with the texture of steak - so I’ve probably eaten more hamburgers than almost anyone else in the world. Here’s how I cook mine.
 

Read more... )

P.S. - Leftover burgers can be refrigerated for a few days or frozen for much longer. They re-heat best either on the grill (be careful not to overcook!) or by being wrapped in aluminum foil with bit of marinade and put in the oven at around 450 degrees for ten to fifteen minutes (this is handy to do if you're making french fries in the oven as well). They'll be on the well-done side, but still very flavorful! I've also had excellent results using leftover hamburgers to make dirty rice. The smokiness of the burgers adds a nice extra kick.


Dynamites

Sep. 20th, 2009 06:17 pm
bobquasit: (Default)
As I've mentioned before, Rhode Island has one of the few remaining unexploited regional cuisines in the US. The city of Woonsocket has its own unique cuisine as well. I'm a transplant to Woonsocket, but since I've been living here for more than ten years now, I thought I'd take a stab at a Woonsocket dish.

I must admit that I was inspired by something I had at the Great Pumpkin Festival over in North Smithfield (which adjoins Woonsocket) on Saturday.

It was a dynamite, made by the North Smithfield firefighters. Very spicy, but very good. I looked up a few recipes online, and then went and basically winged my own version. It came out pretty good!

  • 2.5 lbs 80% lean ground beef

  • 2 medium yellow onions, coarsely chopped

  • 1 large red pepper, coarsely chopped (green is traditional, but cooked green peppers disagree with Teri)

  • 2 celery stalks, coarsely chopped

  • 1 16-oz can tomato sauce, Italian style

  • 1 8-0z. can tomato paste

  • Minced gtarlic (I forgot this, and added dried minced garlic later; at a guess, 3-4 cloves would have been good)

  • Sea salt and black pepper (red might have been better) to taste


In a very large frying pan, brown beef with the onions. Once most of the pink is gone from the meat and the onions are starting to turn clear, add the red pepper and celery. Continue to cook at a medium heat until the peppers and celery are soft - the red peppers will start losing their skins. At this point most of the fat should have cooked off (do not cover the pan while cooking!). Add the tomato sauce, tomato paste, plenty of pepper (black and/or red), and salt to taste. Stir and simmer for another 10-20 minutes. Serve sandwich-style in soft, fresh Italian torpedo rolls. Leftovers can be stored or frozen.

I have to say, it was easier to make than I expected! And pretty good, too. It was my idea to not drain the meat before adding the peppers and celery, and it turned out to be a good one. They cooked very nicely in the hot fat.

Of course I have to admit that it's not the healthiest dish in the world...

P.S. - Of course I've had dynamites many times before. Chelos (a small Rhode Island chain of family restaurants) used to make an excellent one, although only at two of their locations. But they changed their recipe a while back, and it's nowhere near as good.

I can't remember what the dynamites were like at The Castle, but either I haven't tried them or they didn't make a big impression on me.

The dynamites at Bellingham Palace didn't work for me. The pieces of vegetable were far too big, and the whole thing didn't taste right. That's the only time I've had anything at Bellingham Palace that wasn't really good, though.

Dynamites are often served at local carnivals and festivals. Woonsocket also has at least one dynamite cook-off each year, and probably more (and no, I will not be entering).

Argh! I'm starving!

Dynamites

Sep. 20th, 2009 06:17 pm
bobquasit: (Default)
As I've mentioned before, Rhode Island has one of the few remaining unexploited regional cuisines in the US. The city of Woonsocket has its own unique cuisine as well. I'm a transplant to Woonsocket, but since I've been living here for more than ten years now, I thought I'd take a stab at a Woonsocket dish.

I must admit that I was inspired by something I had at the Great Pumpkin Festival over in North Smithfield (which adjoins Woonsocket) on Saturday.

It was a dynamite, made by the North Smithfield firefighters. Very spicy, but very good. I looked up a few recipes online, and then went and basically winged my own version. It came out pretty good!

  • 2.5 lbs 80% lean ground beef

  • 2 medium yellow onions, coarsely chopped

  • 1 large red pepper, coarsely chopped (green is traditional, but cooked green peppers disagree with Teri)

  • 2 celery stalks, coarsely chopped

  • 1 16-oz can tomato sauce, Italian style

  • 1 8-0z. can tomato paste

  • Minced gtarlic (I forgot this, and added dried minced garlic later; at a guess, 3-4 cloves would have been good)

  • Sea salt and black pepper (red might have been better) to taste


In a very large frying pan, brown beef with the onions. Once most of the pink is gone from the meat and the onions are starting to turn clear, add the red pepper and celery. Continue to cook at a medium heat until the peppers and celery are soft - the red peppers will start losing their skins. At this point most of the fat should have cooked off (do not cover the pan while cooking!). Add the tomato sauce, tomato paste, plenty of pepper (black and/or red), and salt to taste. Stir and simmer for another 10-20 minutes. Serve sandwich-style in soft, fresh Italian torpedo rolls. Leftovers can be stored or frozen.

I have to say, it was easier to make than I expected! And pretty good, too. It was my idea to not drain the meat before adding the peppers and celery, and it turned out to be a good one. They cooked very nicely in the hot fat.

Of course I have to admit that it's not the healthiest dish in the world...

P.S. - Of course I've had dynamites many times before. Chelos (a small Rhode Island chain of family restaurants) used to make an excellent one, although only at two of their locations. But they changed their recipe a while back, and it's nowhere near as good.

I can't remember what the dynamites were like at The Castle, but either I haven't tried them or they didn't make a big impression on me.

The dynamites at Bellingham Palace didn't work for me. The pieces of vegetable were far too big, and the whole thing didn't taste right. That's the only time I've had anything at Bellingham Palace that wasn't really good, though.

Dynamites are often served at local carnivals and festivals. Woonsocket also has at least one dynamite cook-off each year, and probably more (and no, I will not be entering).

Argh! I'm starving!

Del's

Sep. 13th, 2009 09:21 pm
bobquasit: (Default)
Teri and I drove into Providence this afternoon. We took route 195 to 44 East, Taunton Ave. It has a couple of places where it splits and curves, and on the first one we missed it; Taunton Ave went left and we went straight. It was an interesting-looking area, once I wouldn't mind exploring more. We saw a Del's Frozen Lemonade place, which might have been their main retail location, I don't know.

Teri got a grapefruit-flavored frozen lemonade. She liked it very much. I had a regular, which was also good.

I was interested to see that they also sold Del's Frozen Lemonade mix; "Just add water and ice". It was $9.95. Maybe if we go there again sometime, I'll try it.

They also had hot dogs and such, by the way.

Del's

Sep. 13th, 2009 09:21 pm
bobquasit: (Default)
Teri and I drove into Providence this afternoon. We took route 195 to 44 East, Taunton Ave. It has a couple of places where it splits and curves, and on the first one we missed it; Taunton Ave went left and we went straight. It was an interesting-looking area, once I wouldn't mind exploring more. We saw a Del's Frozen Lemonade place, which might have been their main retail location, I don't know.

Teri got a grapefruit-flavored frozen lemonade. She liked it very much. I had a regular, which was also good.

I was interested to see that they also sold Del's Frozen Lemonade mix; "Just add water and ice". It was $9.95. Maybe if we go there again sometime, I'll try it.

They also had hot dogs and such, by the way.

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