We're back

Sep. 8th, 2009 12:15 pm
bobquasit: (Default)
It was a nice, relaxing vacation. I took a lot of pictures. I'll write more about it later.

We're back

Sep. 8th, 2009 12:15 pm
bobquasit: (Default)
It was a nice, relaxing vacation. I took a lot of pictures. I'll write more about it later.

Pain

Jul. 7th, 2009 01:31 pm
bobquasit: (Default)
I am in intense pain. I have DS finger.

It's because I played a lot of Super Mario DS 64 on vacation, and even more on the trip home and yesterday. I was trying to get the Wario hat. I succeeded in a final frenzy of effort (the Wario boss is tough), but ended up hurting my right index finger quite badly.

How badly? I got relatively little sleep last night; when I did finally manage to get to sleep, I could still feel the pain in my dreams. In fact, I dreamed that my fingernail was badly infected, and that I'd gone to the doctor. He injected me under the fingernail with antibiotics, several times. Rather than be terrified as I normally would be by such a prospect, I gladly accepted the shots...and then waited for the pain to go away.
Read more... )
Last night he went on a "cleaning" spree in his room to try to find the game, and ended up making it far messier than it had been. He dumped everything off the top of his bureau onto the floor. He still didn't find the game, unfortunately. We're going to have to walk him through a proper cleaning, I suspect.

Pain

Jul. 7th, 2009 01:31 pm
bobquasit: (Default)
I am in intense pain. I have DS finger.

It's because I played a lot of Super Mario DS 64 on vacation, and even more on the trip home and yesterday. I was trying to get the Wario hat. I succeeded in a final frenzy of effort (the Wario boss is tough), but ended up hurting my right index finger quite badly.

How badly? I got relatively little sleep last night; when I did finally manage to get to sleep, I could still feel the pain in my dreams. In fact, I dreamed that my fingernail was badly infected, and that I'd gone to the doctor. He injected me under the fingernail with antibiotics, several times. Rather than be terrified as I normally would be by such a prospect, I gladly accepted the shots...and then waited for the pain to go away.
Read more... )
Last night he went on a "cleaning" spree in his room to try to find the game, and ended up making it far messier than it had been. He dumped everything off the top of his bureau onto the floor. He still didn't find the game, unfortunately. We're going to have to walk him through a proper cleaning, I suspect.

Maine

Aug. 14th, 2006 09:37 pm
bobquasit: (Default)
Once again it's a bit late, I'm tired, and I want to get this post done. So here goes.

...

Oh, the hell with it. I'll just post photos with notes.



This is me standing on a set of boulders next to my parents' house in Maine; they're perhaps 18 feet tall. I don't know what the expression on my face means, either.



This is the grave of my family's old cat, Pookie. It's on the top of that hill (above the boulders).



A caterpillar, obviously. We found it next to the lake. We also found an inchworm that fascinated Sebastian, but I didn't get a good sharp picture of it.



This is the lighthouse at Pemaquid Point. It's actually pretty small, no more than thirty feet high at a guess. We climbed up (except for Teri), and lit up the light. Speaking of which:



Nice close shot of the Fresnel lens, huh? Notice that the light was just in the process of fading.

Later we walked down on the long, sloping rocks next to the sea. Sebastian, my brother, and his two children were all walking around when suddenly someone pointed out something pretty surprising on the rocks nearby:



Yup, it was a seal. Smallish, between three and four feet long; it wasn't dead or obviously injured, but it didn't seem right that it wouldn't be moving away, since there were some people within ten feet of it. It moved a little every now and then, and seemed to be breathing a little hard. My brother went back to the lighthouse to get a staff member to come down; he also called a marine mammal number that was posted back on shore. I just stood (not too close) and stared. It was odd; I felt a bit paralyzed. I'm not sure why.

In a while a staff member came down, and told us that this might be a seal that had done the same thing in a nearby location yesterday. My brother came back with the marine mammal specialist on the phone, and arrangements were made to have someone check it out. The staff member suggested we all give the seal more room, so we moved away.

Incidentally, on the way to and from Pemaquid, there's something that I wish I had a picture of. A large stream parallels the road through an absolutely lovely small town, and at one point there's a swimming hole next to a dam and waterfall. It's surrounded by green grass and trees, and is one of the most beautiful and inviting spots I've ever seen. I'll try to get a shot of it next time. There's a sign that calls it "The Swimming Hole at Bristol Dam", but I haven't been able to find out anything about it online - it's probably too obscure.

On the opposite side of the road there's a small stone seat by the roadside. Carved from the same rock is a long white stone trough, and a small jet of water arcs into the trough from the side of the seat. Again, quite lovely.

Hmm...what else? Teri and I went downtown and got ice cream at a place that's simply not to be missed if you're in Boothbay Harbor. I figured "what the hell" and got a waffle cone with four scoops. The entire place - no exaggeration! - gasped when I was handed the cone. It was four huge scoops, far more than I'd expected, and it was already leaning precariously. Teri says I turned red as a beet.

Several people wished me good luck, and I could hear lots of people commenting. I tried to keep the scoops from falling, but ended up letting the top two fall into a cup that Teri had thoughtfully asked for. I ended up taking those two scoops back to the house and having them over the next two days.

Chocolate Fudge Oreo, by the way. And absolutely delicious.

On Sunday my brother and his family went out on the lake with the paddle-boat. He and his son (my nephew) went swimming from the boat. Suddenly I heard several gasps of horror. My nephew had disappeared.

It turned out he'd somehow gone underneath the boat, and gotten his head trapped (but not stuck) in the central channel where the rudder was - it scraped him badly. They could hear him banging his head against the underside of the boat. Talk about terrifying! Fortunately in less than a minute he managed to get out from under. Still, it gave us all quite a scare.

The weather was lovely, and Sebastian had a glorious time. It does makes me sad that the summer is passing so quickly, though, and that the odds are that the house will be sold before too much longer.

Maine

Aug. 14th, 2006 09:37 pm
bobquasit: (Default)
Once again it's a bit late, I'm tired, and I want to get this post done. So here goes.

...

Oh, the hell with it. I'll just post photos with notes.



This is me standing on a set of boulders next to my parents' house in Maine; they're perhaps 18 feet tall. I don't know what the expression on my face means, either.



This is the grave of my family's old cat, Pookie. It's on the top of that hill (above the boulders).



A caterpillar, obviously. We found it next to the lake. We also found an inchworm that fascinated Sebastian, but I didn't get a good sharp picture of it.



This is the lighthouse at Pemaquid Point. It's actually pretty small, no more than thirty feet high at a guess. We climbed up (except for Teri), and lit up the light. Speaking of which:



Nice close shot of the Fresnel lens, huh? Notice that the light was just in the process of fading.

Later we walked down on the long, sloping rocks next to the sea. Sebastian, my brother, and his two children were all walking around when suddenly someone pointed out something pretty surprising on the rocks nearby:



Yup, it was a seal. Smallish, between three and four feet long; it wasn't dead or obviously injured, but it didn't seem right that it wouldn't be moving away, since there were some people within ten feet of it. It moved a little every now and then, and seemed to be breathing a little hard. My brother went back to the lighthouse to get a staff member to come down; he also called a marine mammal number that was posted back on shore. I just stood (not too close) and stared. It was odd; I felt a bit paralyzed. I'm not sure why.

In a while a staff member came down, and told us that this might be a seal that had done the same thing in a nearby location yesterday. My brother came back with the marine mammal specialist on the phone, and arrangements were made to have someone check it out. The staff member suggested we all give the seal more room, so we moved away.

Incidentally, on the way to and from Pemaquid, there's something that I wish I had a picture of. A large stream parallels the road through an absolutely lovely small town, and at one point there's a swimming hole next to a dam and waterfall. It's surrounded by green grass and trees, and is one of the most beautiful and inviting spots I've ever seen. I'll try to get a shot of it next time. There's a sign that calls it "The Swimming Hole at Bristol Dam", but I haven't been able to find out anything about it online - it's probably too obscure.

On the opposite side of the road there's a small stone seat by the roadside. Carved from the same rock is a long white stone trough, and a small jet of water arcs into the trough from the side of the seat. Again, quite lovely.

Hmm...what else? Teri and I went downtown and got ice cream at a place that's simply not to be missed if you're in Boothbay Harbor. I figured "what the hell" and got a waffle cone with four scoops. The entire place - no exaggeration! - gasped when I was handed the cone. It was four huge scoops, far more than I'd expected, and it was already leaning precariously. Teri says I turned red as a beet.

Several people wished me good luck, and I could hear lots of people commenting. I tried to keep the scoops from falling, but ended up letting the top two fall into a cup that Teri had thoughtfully asked for. I ended up taking those two scoops back to the house and having them over the next two days.

Chocolate Fudge Oreo, by the way. And absolutely delicious.

On Sunday my brother and his family went out on the lake with the paddle-boat. He and his son (my nephew) went swimming from the boat. Suddenly I heard several gasps of horror. My nephew had disappeared.

It turned out he'd somehow gone underneath the boat, and gotten his head trapped (but not stuck) in the central channel where the rudder was - it scraped him badly. They could hear him banging his head against the underside of the boat. Talk about terrifying! Fortunately in less than a minute he managed to get out from under. Still, it gave us all quite a scare.

The weather was lovely, and Sebastian had a glorious time. It does makes me sad that the summer is passing so quickly, though, and that the odds are that the house will be sold before too much longer.
bobquasit: (Default)
Well, here I am in Maine. And I'm kicking myself because I've already forgotten the camera THREE TIMES when I could have gotten some great pictures.

I'm on a library computer, slotted for half an hour, so I have to write fast. I may try to do a voice post - in fact, I already tried a couple of times - but cell phone coverage is a bit spotty up here. Anyway:

We drove up on Sunday; there wasn't much traffic. In fact, there have been a lot fewer tourists around here than there usually are. In part that may be because of the weather. The weathermen predicted rain and thunderstorms throughout the week, which probably dissuaded many people from making the trip. But I hear that tourism in general is down, thanks at least in part to high gas prices.

Here are the times when I wish I'd brought the camera:

Monday: The Boothbay Railway. As always, we took Sebastian there for a train ride, and as always, he had lots of fun.

Tuesday: We went somewhere new, the lighthouse at Pemaquid Point. The lighthouse is small, but we climbed all the way up to the top and Sebastian got to turn the light on. The heat through the Fresnel lens was surprising. Sebastian loved it.

The rocks there were also amazing. Huge expanses of tilted, layered rock, with many narrow runnels worn into them by millenia of seawater, slanting down into the sea. My father and I took Sebastian far out on the rocks, climbing a huge 15-foot high boulder, and then going a bit further out - until he got a bit scared. We had a picnic and headed back home, but we'll definitely do it again - this time with a camera. Teri probably won't go up the lighthouse again, though, since she got vertigo while climbing down the circular stairs of the lighthouse.

Tuesday night, July 4th, was Sebastian's first chance to see real fireworks. Incidentally, up to that point the weather prediction had been completely wrong; the weather had been glorious. But on Tuesday it did get very foggy and (as I kept saying) wierd. It looked like it might rain, or might not; the weather seesawed all day, rapidly.

We had a few sprinkles, but as the evening approached it was clear that the fireworks would be on. Sebastian stayed up late, way past his bedtime. At 8:30 we went to the docks downtown, the best place to watch the fireworks. I was amazed that there was enough parking, by the way - yet more evidence that tourism is way down.

We waited for what felt like a long time. Sebastian was interested, but nervous. Finally the fireworks started. I heard him say "Wait 'til I tell my friends about this!". The display was excellent, with some new types of fireworks that I hadn't seen before. It wasn't terribly loud, but Sebastian dislikes loud noises, so he covered his ears. Eventually he started asking to go home - he asked three times in all, and fussed a bit but didn't cry.

After the finale we took him back to the car (he kept begging to be carried), and he seemed a bit overwhelmed. We took him home, and he fell asleep soon after we got him in bed - it only took two songs to knock him out.

This morning we had breakfast at the Rock Tide Inn, and I saw something rather remarkable. The inn is right on the water. When we sat down, the fog was heavy. Outside the windows, everything was white. But as we ate, the fog lifted. Slowly more and more became visible - docks and boats - and by the time we were done, the sun was shining gloriously on the houses on the far side of the harbor. It was really beautiful.

Sebastian was happy because they turned the overhead model trains on, but he soon tired of that to run outside with my mother. After I came out, he insisted that I walk around on the docks with him. One of them scared him a little by sliding away rather precipitously when he stepped on it, but he insisted on doing it again, just for fun.

Later Teri, my mother, and I took Sebastian was a walk near the sea. I did get some photos, hopefully good ones, and I'll see if I can post some when we get home. That will probably be sometime tomorrow evening, by the way.

We're going to try to take him to the Railway Village again before we go, so I'll see if I can get some pictures there, too. But the Pemaquid lighthouse was the really spectacular sight of this vacation, and I won't be able to go there again on this trip. We'll try to do it when we come back up in August.

It has been weird without computer access, I have to say. But not so bad.
bobquasit: (Default)
Well, here I am in Maine. And I'm kicking myself because I've already forgotten the camera THREE TIMES when I could have gotten some great pictures.

I'm on a library computer, slotted for half an hour, so I have to write fast. I may try to do a voice post - in fact, I already tried a couple of times - but cell phone coverage is a bit spotty up here. Anyway:

We drove up on Sunday; there wasn't much traffic. In fact, there have been a lot fewer tourists around here than there usually are. In part that may be because of the weather. The weathermen predicted rain and thunderstorms throughout the week, which probably dissuaded many people from making the trip. But I hear that tourism in general is down, thanks at least in part to high gas prices.

Here are the times when I wish I'd brought the camera:

Monday: The Boothbay Railway. As always, we took Sebastian there for a train ride, and as always, he had lots of fun.

Tuesday: We went somewhere new, the lighthouse at Pemaquid Point. The lighthouse is small, but we climbed all the way up to the top and Sebastian got to turn the light on. The heat through the Fresnel lens was surprising. Sebastian loved it.

The rocks there were also amazing. Huge expanses of tilted, layered rock, with many narrow runnels worn into them by millenia of seawater, slanting down into the sea. My father and I took Sebastian far out on the rocks, climbing a huge 15-foot high boulder, and then going a bit further out - until he got a bit scared. We had a picnic and headed back home, but we'll definitely do it again - this time with a camera. Teri probably won't go up the lighthouse again, though, since she got vertigo while climbing down the circular stairs of the lighthouse.

Tuesday night, July 4th, was Sebastian's first chance to see real fireworks. Incidentally, up to that point the weather prediction had been completely wrong; the weather had been glorious. But on Tuesday it did get very foggy and (as I kept saying) wierd. It looked like it might rain, or might not; the weather seesawed all day, rapidly.

We had a few sprinkles, but as the evening approached it was clear that the fireworks would be on. Sebastian stayed up late, way past his bedtime. At 8:30 we went to the docks downtown, the best place to watch the fireworks. I was amazed that there was enough parking, by the way - yet more evidence that tourism is way down.

We waited for what felt like a long time. Sebastian was interested, but nervous. Finally the fireworks started. I heard him say "Wait 'til I tell my friends about this!". The display was excellent, with some new types of fireworks that I hadn't seen before. It wasn't terribly loud, but Sebastian dislikes loud noises, so he covered his ears. Eventually he started asking to go home - he asked three times in all, and fussed a bit but didn't cry.

After the finale we took him back to the car (he kept begging to be carried), and he seemed a bit overwhelmed. We took him home, and he fell asleep soon after we got him in bed - it only took two songs to knock him out.

This morning we had breakfast at the Rock Tide Inn, and I saw something rather remarkable. The inn is right on the water. When we sat down, the fog was heavy. Outside the windows, everything was white. But as we ate, the fog lifted. Slowly more and more became visible - docks and boats - and by the time we were done, the sun was shining gloriously on the houses on the far side of the harbor. It was really beautiful.

Sebastian was happy because they turned the overhead model trains on, but he soon tired of that to run outside with my mother. After I came out, he insisted that I walk around on the docks with him. One of them scared him a little by sliding away rather precipitously when he stepped on it, but he insisted on doing it again, just for fun.

Later Teri, my mother, and I took Sebastian was a walk near the sea. I did get some photos, hopefully good ones, and I'll see if I can post some when we get home. That will probably be sometime tomorrow evening, by the way.

We're going to try to take him to the Railway Village again before we go, so I'll see if I can get some pictures there, too. But the Pemaquid lighthouse was the really spectacular sight of this vacation, and I won't be able to go there again on this trip. We'll try to do it when we come back up in August.

It has been weird without computer access, I have to say. But not so bad.
bobquasit: (Default)
It breaks my heart to see it, but here's the listing - with photographs - of my parents' house in Maine.
bobquasit: (Default)
It breaks my heart to see it, but here's the listing - with photographs - of my parents' house in Maine.
bobquasit: (Default)
We drove up to Maine on Wednesday afternoon. There was less traffic than we'd ever seen before, all the way up to Boothbay. Sebastian slept for part of the trip, then woke up and expressed a deep dislike of highways.

"Is this a highway?"

"Um...yes."

"NO! NO HIGHWAY!", accompanied by tears and shouts of dismay.

It was raining when we pulled up to the house. I unstrapped Sebastian, who ran to the house to see Grandma - only to experience a sudden attack of shyness. But that soon passed, and before long he was running all over the house.

Dan, Jen, William, Lily, and Craig came in at about 11PM; we were asleep upstairs.

Okay, I'm not going to get too detailed here, because I just don't have the time.

The kids had a lot of fun, running around, shouting, playing, etc. They listened to the Peter and the Wolf and Super Mario 64 CDs I'd brought up. Looking back, I wish I'd brought up the Nintendo itself; we'd have had some fun with it.

Both William and Craig want a copy of the Mario CD. Just a note for myself.

We went downtown and I got to hit the library porch. There were a lot fewer books than there are in-season, but I was still able to find ten good ones. Most of them were children's books, including another version of The Aristocats. Sebastian was quite pleased. We left some of them up there, and brought the rest home.

We took a long walk out in the fields and woods in the back of the house during a short lull in the rain. Saw the broken-down old turkey coops, the stream, and some big rocks. Sebastian soon decided he was tired and had me carry him. We all climbed up on a rock and Dan took a picture, but it came out very blurry.

During the walk Sebastian started telling a strange story. Something about "Uncle Dan and Craig and William [who were ranging ahead of the rest of us] all disappeared suddenly, but there was no wolf nearby." I have no idea what that was about.

I brought a length of birch bark back from the walk, but Teri didn't want to bring it home so I left it rolled up in the hollow of the old water-pump lamp that I made back in junior high.

On Friday Sebastian woke up at midnight, wailed "I'm going to throw up!", and did. Fortunately Teri was there with a plastic bag, so things could have been much worse. My poor little boy sobbed and sobbed. The attack was over after about ten minutes, and to my surprise there were no repeats. Once we got him quieted down and cleaned up a bit, he insisted that I sleep in his bed. It's an awfully small bed, so I was crammed up against the wall, but he fell asleep soon enough.

The animals and seagulls dined well on the Thanksgiving leftovers. There were lots of seagulls perched on the top of the house, and their shadows fell clearly on the hill in the back.

The trip home was uneventful; Sebastian went in Mom and Dad's car until we stopped and had lunch in York (ME), at Bosun's Landing. The food was excellent, as always, and we discovered that they were closing for the season the next day. Sebastian enjoyed showing Fred, the large blue fish with a big bulge on his head, to Grandma.

After lunch Sebastian came to our car, since we'd be heading for home. The boy objected to being on the highway, and made us take a potty stop at the state liquor store; after, as we were starting to pull out of the parking lot, he made us stop again, claiming that he had more to do. False alarm, it turned out.

Finally we got home. Sebastian was overjoyed to see Sarah; he kept patting her and saying how beautiful she was. Both cats seemed pretty pleased to see us.
bobquasit: (Default)
We drove up to Maine on Wednesday afternoon. There was less traffic than we'd ever seen before, all the way up to Boothbay. Sebastian slept for part of the trip, then woke up and expressed a deep dislike of highways.

"Is this a highway?"

"Um...yes."

"NO! NO HIGHWAY!", accompanied by tears and shouts of dismay.

It was raining when we pulled up to the house. I unstrapped Sebastian, who ran to the house to see Grandma - only to experience a sudden attack of shyness. But that soon passed, and before long he was running all over the house.

Dan, Jen, William, Lily, and Craig came in at about 11PM; we were asleep upstairs.

Okay, I'm not going to get too detailed here, because I just don't have the time.

The kids had a lot of fun, running around, shouting, playing, etc. They listened to the Peter and the Wolf and Super Mario 64 CDs I'd brought up. Looking back, I wish I'd brought up the Nintendo itself; we'd have had some fun with it.

Both William and Craig want a copy of the Mario CD. Just a note for myself.

We went downtown and I got to hit the library porch. There were a lot fewer books than there are in-season, but I was still able to find ten good ones. Most of them were children's books, including another version of The Aristocats. Sebastian was quite pleased. We left some of them up there, and brought the rest home.

We took a long walk out in the fields and woods in the back of the house during a short lull in the rain. Saw the broken-down old turkey coops, the stream, and some big rocks. Sebastian soon decided he was tired and had me carry him. We all climbed up on a rock and Dan took a picture, but it came out very blurry.

During the walk Sebastian started telling a strange story. Something about "Uncle Dan and Craig and William [who were ranging ahead of the rest of us] all disappeared suddenly, but there was no wolf nearby." I have no idea what that was about.

I brought a length of birch bark back from the walk, but Teri didn't want to bring it home so I left it rolled up in the hollow of the old water-pump lamp that I made back in junior high.

On Friday Sebastian woke up at midnight, wailed "I'm going to throw up!", and did. Fortunately Teri was there with a plastic bag, so things could have been much worse. My poor little boy sobbed and sobbed. The attack was over after about ten minutes, and to my surprise there were no repeats. Once we got him quieted down and cleaned up a bit, he insisted that I sleep in his bed. It's an awfully small bed, so I was crammed up against the wall, but he fell asleep soon enough.

The animals and seagulls dined well on the Thanksgiving leftovers. There were lots of seagulls perched on the top of the house, and their shadows fell clearly on the hill in the back.

The trip home was uneventful; Sebastian went in Mom and Dad's car until we stopped and had lunch in York (ME), at Bosun's Landing. The food was excellent, as always, and we discovered that they were closing for the season the next day. Sebastian enjoyed showing Fred, the large blue fish with a big bulge on his head, to Grandma.

After lunch Sebastian came to our car, since we'd be heading for home. The boy objected to being on the highway, and made us take a potty stop at the state liquor store; after, as we were starting to pull out of the parking lot, he made us stop again, claiming that he had more to do. False alarm, it turned out.

Finally we got home. Sebastian was overjoyed to see Sarah; he kept patting her and saying how beautiful she was. Both cats seemed pretty pleased to see us.

Memories

Sep. 19th, 2004 11:48 pm
bobquasit: (Default)
It was rainy all weekend in Maine, so we came back after only one night. But there are a couple of things I want to remember:

Sebastian crawled out of his bed pretty early and came up on our bed to sleep between us. I've been waking up every hour or two most nights lately, no matter where I sleep, and on the Maine bed in particular I have a lot of dreams; it's the bed I used to sleep on as a little boy, fastened next to my brother's identical bed to make one king-sized bed for me and Teri. My grandfather gave those beds to me and my brother when we were young, by the way.

Anyway, I woke up to what I first thought was loud sobbing. But I soon realized that it was laughing; Sebastian had a HUGE grin on his face and was laughing and giggling like crazy.

In his sleep.

Another memory, an older and sadder one: Sebastian, presenting his forehead to Sam. Sam would often smell and snuffle Sebastian with his damp nose, and Sebastian would laugh like crazy (it's a very ticklish feeling, if you've never experienced it). Sebastian started doing that when he was very young, probably not even one and a half years old.

Today he asked me when Sam was coming home.

Memories

Sep. 19th, 2004 11:48 pm
bobquasit: (Default)
It was rainy all weekend in Maine, so we came back after only one night. But there are a couple of things I want to remember:

Sebastian crawled out of his bed pretty early and came up on our bed to sleep between us. I've been waking up every hour or two most nights lately, no matter where I sleep, and on the Maine bed in particular I have a lot of dreams; it's the bed I used to sleep on as a little boy, fastened next to my brother's identical bed to make one king-sized bed for me and Teri. My grandfather gave those beds to me and my brother when we were young, by the way.

Anyway, I woke up to what I first thought was loud sobbing. But I soon realized that it was laughing; Sebastian had a HUGE grin on his face and was laughing and giggling like crazy.

In his sleep.

Another memory, an older and sadder one: Sebastian, presenting his forehead to Sam. Sam would often smell and snuffle Sebastian with his damp nose, and Sebastian would laugh like crazy (it's a very ticklish feeling, if you've never experienced it). Sebastian started doing that when he was very young, probably not even one and a half years old.

Today he asked me when Sam was coming home.
bobquasit: (Default)
I'm back from vacation. I don't know what it is about vacations, but it seems that every time I want to take a photograph, my batteries start to die or something. But here are a few shots.

Read more... )
Next time I'll bring spare batteries.
bobquasit: (Default)
I'm back from vacation. I don't know what it is about vacations, but it seems that every time I want to take a photograph, my batteries start to die or something. But here are a few shots.

Read more... )
Next time I'll bring spare batteries.
bobquasit: (Default)
Maybe I'd lost weight, or size, or something. I don't know. But the two belts that I use most had somehow become too large for me. Even on the tightest settings, they were just too loose. It was getting embarrassing.

So I took them both up to Maine to have them worked on by the guy who made one of them, a belt that fastens through a double ring instead of a buckle (I think he custom-made that one at my request, since it's not something he normally stocks). The other was just a normal belt I'd picked up somewhere.

But I'd forgotten that when he was a kid my father used to be the chemical expert at his father's leather factory in Istanbul. No sooner had I mentioned what I planned to do then he whipped out some sort of drill-auger (or something), and drilled/burned perfect holes as needed. I wish I was half as handy as he is.

But I'd also planned to ask the leather guy to do something about the color of the ring-belt; over the last fifteen years much of the black stain on the leather had leeched away, leaving large faded areas. It looked pretty bad.

Trust my Dad to have a simple solution: liquid shoe polish. He was positive it would work. A week later Teri was cleaning up in the basement in preparation for the big yard sale she's doing tomorrow, and we found an old bottle of black liquid shoe polish (and when I say old, I mean at least fifteen years old). So we polished the belt and left it to dry overnight.

The next day I rubbed the belt down with dry paper towels, and to my amazement the belt looked practically new - and the remaining color didn't run or stain at all.

* * *

Incidentally, I've done a few posts which are viewable by friends only (and a few just for me, if you were wondering). Unfortunately one or two of the people who sometimes read this aren't LJ members. Just a reminder that the accounts are free and invitations are no longer needed. And as far as I can tell, LJ never sends out spam.
bobquasit: (Default)
Maybe I'd lost weight, or size, or something. I don't know. But the two belts that I use most had somehow become too large for me. Even on the tightest settings, they were just too loose. It was getting embarrassing.

So I took them both up to Maine to have them worked on by the guy who made one of them, a belt that fastens through a double ring instead of a buckle (I think he custom-made that one at my request, since it's not something he normally stocks). The other was just a normal belt I'd picked up somewhere.

But I'd forgotten that when he was a kid my father used to be the chemical expert at his father's leather factory in Istanbul. No sooner had I mentioned what I planned to do then he whipped out some sort of drill-auger (or something), and drilled/burned perfect holes as needed. I wish I was half as handy as he is.

But I'd also planned to ask the leather guy to do something about the color of the ring-belt; over the last fifteen years much of the black stain on the leather had leeched away, leaving large faded areas. It looked pretty bad.

Trust my Dad to have a simple solution: liquid shoe polish. He was positive it would work. A week later Teri was cleaning up in the basement in preparation for the big yard sale she's doing tomorrow, and we found an old bottle of black liquid shoe polish (and when I say old, I mean at least fifteen years old). So we polished the belt and left it to dry overnight.

The next day I rubbed the belt down with dry paper towels, and to my amazement the belt looked practically new - and the remaining color didn't run or stain at all.

* * *

Incidentally, I've done a few posts which are viewable by friends only (and a few just for me, if you were wondering). Unfortunately one or two of the people who sometimes read this aren't LJ members. Just a reminder that the accounts are free and invitations are no longer needed. And as far as I can tell, LJ never sends out spam.
bobquasit: (Default)
We're back. And here are some photos of our trip to Maine.
Read more... )

And that's the story!
bobquasit: (Default)
We're back. And here are some photos of our trip to Maine.
Read more... )

And that's the story!

July 2017

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